HS2 imminent activities

At the latest meeting with HS2, we raised with them the recent confusions over the use of the fields by the cricket club and asked that they significantly improve their communications with the community.

HS2 has now advised us of some forthcoming work. Two sites off Harvil Road will be required for gas pipeline diversions.  One site is before the railway bridge and the other after the bridge, close to the Dogs Trust. Initially the work will involve clearing the sites and then the contractors will move in and perform the work lasting to December 2018.  Harvil Road has accident black spots and it may be necessary to have traffic signals at the access points to both sites.

Flood report is in

Remember June 23rd last year? For some of you, it was less about the Referendum and more about the local flooding. The residents have spoken and experts have investigated. The .pdf report is 78.2MB. You can either download it using that link or go to the relevant LBH page at www.hillingdon.gov.uk/article/29022/Flood-risk-investigation

The quick way to find the local bits is to search for Ickenham. You’ll see all the reported incidents with a few of going into further detail with maps, actions taken, etc.

(I tried searching by road name but was less successful. I believe that Ivy House Road/Milton Road suffered quite badly but could find no details. Perhaps that one wasn’t 23rd June or may)

Anyway, if you’re interested, take a look. Maybe comment here – praise or criticism, we don’t mind.

 

HS2 and the rumour mill

On the day following the election, some HS2 notices appeared around some of Ickenham’s open spaces. They comprised several pages and it’s easy to see why some residents drew the wrong conclusions. Unfortunately, these wrong conclusions found their way onto Facebook and created a lot of heat and steam.

We thought it best to present some of the salient facts presented in the documents. If we learn more about HS2’s intentions we will let you know.

First of all, here’s the map of the (red-outlined) area debated on Facebook:

This area lies between Hoylake Cresent and the Chiltern Railway line.

Here is a snap of what HS2 intends to do here:

Since the Facebook alarm was about HS2 using the area “for storage of construction equipment for the building of HS2”, we think this paragraph (and the fact it’s a short-term survey) led to the misunderstanding.:

Apologies for the rubbish photographs. We thought it best to present the original documents rather than a transcript.

Northolt protest notes

Quite a number of you will have received leaflets through your letter box from a group calling itself STOP NORTHOLT. We would like to give you the facts as we know them regarding the claims in this leaflet:

  1. Runway works to start in 2018 – these are to REPAIR the runway and improve the arrester beds to prevent aircraft overshooting onto the A40. These have been promised for some time but the MoD has finally released the necessary monies
  2. Possible scheduled service – this has been floating around for some time – realistically with the airbase operating as it does now there is NO way a scheduled service could operate out of Northolt.
  3. The number of movements and type of civilian aircraft are strictly limited
    • The maximum no of movements per year is 12000 (a movement is a landing or a take-off) – these can only operate between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Monday to Friday and 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
  4. The maximum number of movements per day is 40.
    • Aircraft have a maximum capacity of 29 passengers.
    • We hope this helps to clarify the situation.

Microsoft Tech-Support Scammers using WannaCry attack to lure victims

Once again, our friends at Neighbourhood Watch have sent us some information on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau):

Action Fraud has received the first reports of Tech-Support scammers claiming to be from Microsoft who are taking advantage of the global WannaCry ransomware attack.

One victim fell for the scam after calling a ‘help’ number advertised on a pop-up window. The window which wouldn’t close said the victim had been affected by WannaCry Ransomware.

The victim granted the fraudsters remote access to their PC after being convinced there wasn’t sufficient anti-virus protection. The fraudsters then installed Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool, which is actually free and took £320 as payment.

It is important to remember that Microsoft’s error and warning messages on your PC will never include a phone number.

Additionally Microsoft will never proactively reach out to you to provide unsolicited PC or technical support. Any communication they have with you must be initiated by you.

How to protect yourself:

  • Don’t call numbers from pop-up messages.
  • Never allow remote access to your computer.
  • Always be wary of unsolicited calls. If you’re unsure of a caller’s identity, hang up.
  • Never divulge passwords or pin numbers.
  • Microsoft or someone on their behalf will never call you.

If you believe you have already been a victim:

  • Get your computer checked for any additional programmes or software that may have been installed.
  • Contact your bank to stop any further payments being taken.

Report fraud and cyber crime to Actionfraud.police.uk